Tam O’Shaughnessy Mourns Death Of Lesbian Partner, Sally Ride

Sally Ride, the first US woman who travel in space, died on Monday after 17 months suffering from a harm disease of cancer, reports from her organization, Sally Ride Science. She was 61.

Ride made a record for American women in 1983 when she and four her crewmates blasted off aboard space shuttle Challenger. She was again headed to her second mission for spacing a year later.

A former astronaut and Nasa administrator said in statement, “Sally Ride broke barriers with grace and professionalism – and literally changed the face of America’s space program.”

Sally Ride, the first American woman to journey into space, died on Monday after a 17-month battle with pancreatic cancer, her foundation announced. She was 61.

Sally Ride, the first American woman to journey into space, died on Monday after a 17-month battle with pancreatic cancer, her foundation announced. She was 61.

Ride was born and grew up in Los Angeles where she attended Stanford University and got degrees in physics and English. She appointed for Nasa corps in 1978.

She was settled as to a third shuttle flight but training for the mission was disclosed after fatal Challenger accident in 1986 that claimed the six lives of colleagues and a schoolteacher.

Smart and smiling face, confident and strong was comfortable in world dominated by crew-cut men, igniting the imagination of

Nasa administrator said in a statement Ride, “literally changed the face of America’s space programme” and that “the nation has lost one of its finest leaders, teachers, and explorers.”

In an interview marking the 25th anniversary of the mission, Ride said she was proud be a later woman who flew to the space and “came to appreciate what an honor it was to be selected to be the first (US woman) to get a chance to go into space.” Her groundbreaking space voyage came two decades after the first Soviet woman flew to the space.

Since Sally’s death, Sally Ride Science’s donors reported that they “want to continue funding and supporting our programs,” Flammer said. “The transition will be hard, but we want to keep going as a tribute to her.”

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